AK-Genta

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DESCRIPTION

Gentamicin sulfate is a water-soluble antibiotic of the aminoglycoside group.
Gentamicin Sulfate Ophthalmic Solution is a sterile, aqueous solution for ophthalmic use.

Each mL contains:
Active: Gentamicin Sulfate USP (equivalent to 3 mg gentamicin base)
Preservative: Benzalkonium Chloride
Inactives: Disodium Phosphate, Monosodium Phosphate, and Sodium Chloride. The pH range is from 6.8 to 7.3.
Gentamicin is obtained from cultures of Micromonospora purpurea. It is a mixture of the sulfate salts of gentamicin C1, C2, and C1A. All three components appear to have similar antimicrobial activities. Gentamicin sulfate occurs as a white powder and is soluble in water and insoluble in alcohol. The structural formula is as follows:

CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY Microbiology

Gentamicin sulfate is active in vitro against many strains of the following microorganisms: Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pyogenes,
Streptococcus pneumoniae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Haemophilus influenzae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Serratia marcescens.

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

Gentamicin Sulfate Sterile Ophthalmic Solution is indicated in the topical treatment of ocular bacterial infections, including conjunctivitis, keratitis, keratoconjunctivitis, corneal ulcers, blepharitis, blepharoconjunctivitis, acute meibomianitis, and dacryocystitis caused by susceptible strains of the following microorganisms: Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pyogenes,
Streptococcus pneumoniae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Haemophilus
influenzae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Serratia marcescens.

CONTRAINDICATIONS

Gentamicin Sulfate Sterile Ophthalmic Solution is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to any of the components.

WARNINGS:

NOT FOR INJECTION INTO THE EYE. Gentamicin Sulfate Ophthalmic Solution is not for injection. It should never be injected subconjunctivally, nor should it be directly introduced into the anterior chamber of the eye.Read More